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Detox News
Region Four Substance Abuse & Mental Health Crisis Center
400 North Allumbaugh Street, Boise, Idaho 83704

December 04, 2008
Boise agrees to deal to create detox center

- STATESMAN STAFF
Edition Date: 12/04/08

The Boise City Council on Tuesday night voted to enter a joint agreement to create and fund a community detox and mental health center.

The other entities involved in the agreement are the state Department of Health and Welfare, Ada County, Meridian and Eagle. The agreement includes commitments for first-year operating costs of $900,000 from the state, $250,000 from Ada County, $240,000 from Boise, $52,000 from Meridian and $16,000 from Eagle.

Boise's portion will come from the state's annual liquor tax revenue refund.

In April, funding was secured to buy the land and build the center on North Allumbaugh Street west of Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center.

The center will provide short-term, medically monitored detox, sobering and mental health services.

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December 15, 2008
Treasure Valley detox center will open in January 2010

By Chad Dryden - cdryden@idahostatesman.com
Edition Date: 12/15/08

Groundbreaking for the Treasure Valley’s first community detox and mental health center will take place in April 2009, with an eye on a January 2010 opening, local and state officials said Monday morning. The center has been in the works for more than a decade.
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Crisis Center, to be built on North Allumbaugh Street west of Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, will provide short-term, medically monitored detox, sobering and mental health services.

The 9,200-square-foot facility initially will house a sobering station, 12-bed detoxification area and eight-bed mental health crisis area. Patients will be stabilized and monitored for an average of three to five days.

Local and state leaders spoke of the need for the center during a Monday morning news conference at Boise City Hall.

More than 17,000 Treasure Valley residents struggle with at least one chemical addiction, and many of them have underlying mental and physical health issues, city officials said. Hundreds are denied treatment by private medical providers each month because of inability to pay. The center will give them a place to turn.

“We think this makes good sense to figure out a way to deal with these addictions before they become a problem for the community and these people end up in jail,” said Ada County Commissioner Fred Tilman.

Partners in the center are the state Department of Health and Welfare, Ada County and the cities of Boise, Meridian and Eagle. They have signed a joint agreement to create and fund the center, which will cost an estimated $2.7 million to build and $1.8 million a year to operate.

Each entity has committed funds for first-year operating costs of the center: $900,000 from the state, $250,000 from Ada County, $240,000 from Boise, $52,000 from Meridian and $16,000 from Eagle.

In April, funding was secured to buy the land and build the center. The facility will be owned by the Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority and operated by a third-party medical provider.

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December 15, 2008
Mayor eyes spring for detox groundbreaking

- The Associated Press
Edition Date: 12/15/08

Developers of a detox center in Boise say they intend to break ground on the new facility in April in hopes of having the new center operational by January 2010.
Boise Mayor Dave Bieter says the Treasure Valley lacks a functional detox center and has needed a substitute for county jails and hospital emergency rooms for more than 20 years.

The so-called Substance Abuse and Mental Health Crisis Center will be built near St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. The 9,200-square-foot facility will initially feature a sobering station, 12-bed detoxification area and eight-bed mental health crisis area.

In Boise Monday, officials from the state and local governments signed a joint agreement signaling their partnership in the facility.

Officials estimate that more than 17,000 Treasure Valley residents struggle with at least one chemical addiction.

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December 16, 2008
Long-awaited detox center may open in boise in 2010

The substance abuse crisis facility will serve low-income, uninsured residents of the Treasure Valley.

BY CHAD DRYDEN - cdryden@idahostatesman.com
Edition Date: 12/16/08

A Treasure Valley community detox and mental health center that has been in the works for more than a decade will break ground in April 2009 and could open in January 2010, local and state officials said Monday.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Crisis Center will provide short-term, medically monitored detox, sobering and mental health services for low-income, uninsured residents.

It will be the first center of its kind in Idaho, according to Richard Armstrong, director of the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

The 9,200-square-foot facility, to be built on North Allumbaugh Street west of Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, will have three components:

A sobering station for intoxicated people judged to be a risk to themselves or the community.

A 12-bed detoxification area for substance abusers to stabilize their physical condition before seeking recovery.

An eight-bed mental health crisis area for monitoring patients experiencing short-term psychiatric instability.

Local and state leaders spoke of the need for the center during a Monday morning news conference at Boise City Hall.

More than 17,000 Treasure Valley residents struggle with at least one chemical addiction, and many of them have underlying mental and physical health issues, said Ada County Commissioner Fred Tilman.

Hundreds each month are denied treatment by private facilities because of inability to pay, and often the only alternatives are the hospital emergency room or jail. The center will give them another place to turn.

"This crisis center really fills a gap," Ada County Commissioner Paul Woods said. "This is an opportunity to deliver a service to our citizens that has been long needed."

Officials say the early intervention provided by the center will save some substance abusers from prison. In Idaho state prisons, 85 percent of inmates have substance abuse problems, Eagle Mayor Phil Bandy said.

"We think this makes good sense to figure out a way to deal with these addictions before they become a problem for the community and these people end up in jail," Tilman said.

A detox center, which operates at a fraction of the cost of hospitals and jails, also saves taxpayer money.

"This is a much more efficient way of dealing with these societal problems," Armstrong said. "I see it as a mold (that) could be replicated throughout the state of Idaho."

As far back as 14 years, local officials were discussing the need for the center. The Boise metro area is one of the largest in the country lacking a detox center for people without health insurance.

In 2006, Ada County Sheriff Gary Raney pitched a county-wide detox center, but a lack of funding killed the project.

The city of Boise has been leading the effort since, committing $1.25 million to the project and organizing more fundraising through a steering committee.

Partners in the center are the state Department of Health and Welfare, Ada County and the cities of Boise, Meridian and Eagle. They have signed a joint agreement to create and fund the center, which will cost an estimated $2.7 million to build and $1.8 million a year to operate.

Each entity has committed funds for first-year operating costs of the center: $900,000 from the state, $250,000 from Ada County, $240,000 from Boise, $52,000 from Meridian and $16,000 from Eagle.

Other partners include the United Way of Treasure Valley, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center and St. Luke's Regional Medical Center.

The facility will be owned by the Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority and operated by a third-party medical provider.

Chad Dryden: 672-6734

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E-Mail: housing@bcacha.org

Content Last Updated 3/16/2017

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